How to Optimize a WordPress Website

WordPress is the most popular content management system (CMS) in the world. Its popularity is largely due to its excellent usability and its broad functionality. WordPress is not only a CMS but also a publishing platform, a webmaster’s best friend, and a full-blown eCommerce solution. These days, it is quite difficult to avoid using WordPress on the web. In fact, according to HubSpot Blogs research, 78% of websites currently use WordPress.

Given its popularity and the large number of businesses and websites run on WordPress, it is not surprising that many are interested in learning how to optimize their websites to gain more traffic, leads, and sales.

Get To The Point

Before we dive into the nitty-gritty of how to optimize a WordPress website, it is important to get to the point. Simply put, traffic is the lifeblood of any website. Everyone wants to maximize their traffic and grow their audience. But how do you do that?

The answer to this question is multifaceted and must be considered from all angles – web hosting, domain name, web design, content, and marketing.

To truly understand how to optimize a WordPress website, you need to know where you are starting from. Here are some metrics you should be monitoring so you can track your website’s progress.

Traffic

Traffic is, quite obviously, the most important of the metrics to monitor and track. Indeed, without traffic, there is no point in having a website. It is quite simple to see how traffic can fluctuate, particularly in the case of a new website, where there is no historical data to reference. As a general rule of thumb, you should look for growth in the early stages and then watch it carefully to see whether or not it is sustainable.

You can start by simply looking at the amount of traffic your website is receiving daily. This is quite easy to find out, since you can use free tools like Google Analytics to track daily traffic as well as its sources. You can also use the Google Analytics’ reporting interface to get an aggregate view of your traffic over time.

Conversions

Next on our list of metrics to track is the number of conversions. A conversion is defined as any action taken by a visitor, other than simply browsing your website. For example, a conversion could be a purchase made by the visitor or an action taken, such as filling out a form or subscribing to a newsletter.

To track conversions, you should use a tool like Google Analytics. The benefit of using a tool like Google Analytics is that it can automatically track conversions for you, so you do not have to. This can be a great relief, especially if you are a busy professional who does not have the time to manually track conversions. In addition, Google Analytics gathers a massive amount of data, so you can get the complete lowdown on your website’s performance, along with a plethora of other metrics.

Sales

Further down on our list of metrics to track is the number of sales. A sale is defined as any transaction in which the consumer exchanges money for a product or service. For the sake of this article, we will assume that the product is digital and delivered electronically.

The number of sales is quite easy to track, too. You can use a tool like Google Analytics to automatically track sales and their sources, or you can manually enter the sales into a spreadsheet. The benefit of using a tool like Google Analytics is that it can instantly provide you with detailed reports on your website’s performance, including the number of sales, their sources, and much more.

Clicks

Another important metric to track is the number of clicks. A click is defined as a single interaction with an interface element on your website. This could be the click of a button, the flip of a switch, or the opening of a link in a web browser.

The number of clicks is quite easy to track, too. You can use a tool like Google Analytics to automatically track clicks and their sources, or you can manually enter the clicks into a spreadsheet. The benefit of using a tool like Google Analytics is that it can instantly provide you with detailed reports on your website’s performance, including the number of clicks and their sources.

Cost Per Acquisition (CPA)

The last but not least of our list of metrics to track is the cost per acquisition (CPA). The cost per acquisition (CPA) is the total cost, expressed as a ratio of revenue to the number of acquisitions. This ratio normalizes for the varying revenue of different products or services. For example, a $20 e-book by a well-known brand might generate $10,000 in revenue but would only yield a cost per acquisition of $5, for a total cost of $15,000.

The cost per acquisition is quite easy to track. You can use a tool like Google Analytics to automatically track the cost per acquisition and their sources, or you can manually enter the cost per acquisition into a spreadsheet. The benefit of using a tool like Google Analytics is that it can instantly provide you with detailed reports on your website’s performance, including the cost per acquisition and their sources.

The purpose of this list of metrics to track is not to teach you how to make a website. That is a world of its own. Rather, these metrics are fundamental for understanding how to make money from a website, how to grow a website, and eventually, how to optimize a website.