How to Remove Unwanted Pages from a Theme in WordPress

WordPress is one of the most popular content-management systems out there, powering millions of websites around the world. It’s incredibly flexible and offers a lot of power to those who know how to use it. But sometimes that power can backfire, resulting in a bloated, slow, or insecure WordPress website. Sometimes there’s just no way of knowing how your blog is going to perform until you’ve actually published it and started getting traffic. But that can be quite the rollercoaster ride, especially if you’re not used to it. So instead of finding yourself in the middle of a content-gathering spree, wondering what to put in your blog and whether or not it’s going to be accepted, you can always take a step back and remove some of the content you don’t need. That’s what this guide is going to help you with: how to remove unwanted pages from a theme in WordPress.

The Good And Bad Of Having Many Pages In A Theme

It’s no secret that WordPress is flexible and offers a lot of power when used right. But as we’ve already established, sometimes that power can backfire and result in an insecure, slow, or bloated WordPress website. Having many pages in a theme is one of the main causes of this issue. When you have a single page in a theme that’s configured to accept posts, that means when someone tries to access another page in the theme, their browser will automatically direct them to that first page, overwriting whatever content they had before. There’s no way to prevent this from happening, and although it might seem like a good idea to have multiple pages in a theme, it’s not always the case. Sometimes all you need is one single, giant page that serves as the homepage of your website. In that case, a lot of the issues that come with having many pages in a theme can be avoided. But sometimes that’s not the desired outcome, and you have to find another way to solve the problem. That’s what this guide is going to help you with: how to remove unwanted pages from a theme in WordPress.

Top Tips For Optimal Performance

Even though we just established the issues that come with having many pages in a theme, none of that matters if your content is relevant and you’re not trying to overwhelm your visitors. Having a lot of content on a page doesn’t automatically mean it’s bad for performance. It depends on a lot of different factors, such as how well the content is configured and whether or not you’re using the right plugins. To give you an idea of what kind of impact these factors have on performance, here’s a shortlist of top tips that can help you optimize your WordPress website.

Use The Right WordPress SEO plugins

One of the main causes of slow, unresponsive websites is poor WordPress SEO. When people say SEO, they usually think about keywords and articles appearing in the top 3 results of a Google search. While those are certainly crucial, what happens on the backend that goes unnoticed by the average person is just as important. When someone opens your website in a web browser, they don’t usually have the time to trawl through all the different themes and plugins that could potentially be slowing down their browser. That’s why it’s crucial to keep the load time of your website as low as possible by using the right SEO plugins. When you use tools like Google Lighthouse, you can actually detect elements of your site that are causing unnecessary work to be done by your web server.

It’s important to note that not all SEO plugins are created equal. Some are built for minimalism and don’t get in the way of your website functioning. Others are more advanced and can completely optimize your content, making it more discoverable by search engines like Google and Bing. If you’re looking for an SEO plugin, make sure to read reviews and take a look at what other users have to say about them. Ultimately, you need a balance between performance and functionality, and the right SEO plugins can assist you in finding that perfect balance.

Keep A Content Calendar

It’s important to keep your blog posts organized and appropriately scheduled so that your readers know when to expect the next installment of content. Sometimes it can be hard to know what to write about, especially if you’re not sure how many readers you have or how much traffic you’re going to get. That’s why it’s a good idea to use a content calendar. You can set up a Google sheet with all the blog posts you have planned and mark them off as you go. That way, you’ll always know what needs to be published and when. It’s also a good idea to keep a separate sheet for each of your blog’s themes, so you can easily identify which one is currently in use. That way, you can easily remove unwanted pages in the theme without having to edit every single one of your blog posts. Just make sure to backup your blog before doing anything, as it’s always a good idea to have a back up of all your important documents and media.

Use Google Tag Mapping

Websites that speed well and load quickly are generally the ones that appear more natural to search engines like Google and Bing. When someone enters a keyword into the search bar on Google or Bing, they’re looking for websites that match the words they typed, and the ones that best match are the ones that appear at the top of the list. If your site doesn’t appear there, it’s going to be difficult to get the traffic you want. That’s why it’s beneficial to use Google Tag Mapping. With this plugin, you can map your keywords to HTML tags that will make your content more searchable. It’s a simple trick that can help you get more traffic, and it doesn’t require you to write any additional code.

Use Lazy Loading Of Images

If you try to manually load all of the images on a particular page of your website, it can slow down your site’s performance significantly. Instead of having every image loaded, which can overwhelm your visitor’s browser, you can use lazy loading of images. With this technique, only the images that are visible on the page are loaded and rendered. When a visitor scrolls down a page, more images are loaded and displayed as the user scrolls. This is a great way of keeping your site’s performance relatively high while still having lots of content.

Reduce Large And Bulky JavaScript Files

JavaScript is a powerful tool that can enhance your site’s functionality and make it more engaging for your visitors. But like most tools, there are different ways in which it can be used for good or bad. If you have a lot of JavaScript tied to the events on your site, it can make your site slow. That’s why it’s a good idea to minimize its use and only use what you need. You don’t have to get rid of all of it, but you can certainly delete the files you don’t need. In most cases, clearing the cache on your website’s browser, or restarting it, is enough to make it go back to its default settings and stop loading the unnecessary JavaScript files. It’s a common misconception that having more JavaScript on a page means it will run faster. In most cases, having large JavaScript files slows things down.

Minimize Your Use Of External Links

When someone visits your website, they want to find something relevant and interesting. For that reason, it’s usually a good idea to keep the content on your site as fresh and up-to-date as possible. Having outdated information or a page that’s not relevant to what the user is looking for doesn’t help. That’s why it’s important to minimize your use of external links. Sometimes you need to add a link to another website, but if you can keep your content internally linked, it will improve the user experience significantly.

The Issues That Come With Having Many Pages In A Theme

So now that you know the importance of having just one giant page as the homepage of your site, let’s dive into the issues that come with having many other pages in a theme. Like I mentioned at the start of this article, when you have a page in a theme that’s configured to accept posts, that means when someone tries to access another page in the theme—whether that’s another post or a completely different page—their browser will direct them to that first page, overwriting whatever content they had before. There’s no way to prevent this from happening, and although it might seem like a good idea to have multiple pages in a theme, it’s not always the case. Sometimes all you need is one single, giant page that serves as the homepage of your website.

When that happens, the following issues can arise: