What’s the Difference Between Shared and WordPress Hosting?

Many businesses have turned to online platforms to facilitate their business, and WordPress is the largest self-hosted community in the world. With hundreds of millions of downloads and a community of over a million members, WordPress is a clear demonstration of the popularity of online collaboration.

It is also one of the most popular content management systems, or CMSs, around, which makes it an obvious choice for online businesses and content creators. If you’re looking to start a blog or website, you may wonder what the difference is between shared hosting and WordPress hosting. We’ll explain the differences and how to choose the right option for your business.

Shared Hosting

If you’re looking for shared hosting, you’ll likely be given the option to pick either a Linux- or Windows-based hosting plan. While both offer features that you may need, you’ll ultimately have to make the decision based on your personal preference.

Shared hosting is the original hosting plan from traditional web hosts. As the name implies, the hosting plan is meant to be shared by multiple websites or blogs. You will share the server’s resources with other users, meaning you may experience delays in service and performance while browsing other websites on the shared host. Because of this, shared hosting is usually considered less suitable for websites or blogs whose traffic and demand for resources is high. However, it does afford users the ability to have full control and ownership of their websites.

WordPress Hosting

With WordPress hosting, you get access to a full-featured, open-source CMS. The CMS will handle the technicalities of building a website or blog, and you’ll have complete control over the content. WordPress’ popularity also makes it relatively easy for developers to create features that make site managing and creation much simpler. For example, if you’re looking for a blogging platform, you may want to consider WordPress.

WordPress is available in two distinct forms: self-hosted and hosted. The first is where you install and run WordPress yourself. The second is where you pay a web host to provide you with the software and space to run your WordPress blog. The decision between the two completely depends on your personal preference. If you choose to go with a hosted WordPress, you lose the ability to customize the appearance of your site. However, you will gain the ability to take your site anywhere with you whenever you want. That’s the main appeal of a hosted WordPress.

The Key Differences In Functionality

Even if you choose to go with a self-hosted WordPress, you will have to make a decision about how much functionality you need. Just like with shared hosting, you’ll have to decide whether you want a basic or a premium version. Let’s take a quick look at the differences.

In the Basic version of WordPress, you get access to all the features necessary for blogging. That includes the ability to create new posts, edit existing posts, view blogs, and manage comments. You don’t get any additional features beyond those listed above with this version, but at least you know what you’re getting.

WordPress’ Premium version adds a lot of extra features that make site managing and creation much simpler. With a Premium version of WordPress, you get the ability to install plugins, take your blog anywhere with you on the go, and use widgets to show content on your site. In addition, you can download and install the WordPress mobile app to your phone or tablet, and use it to easily update and manage your content from anywhere.

The Key Differences In Appearance

Another difference between shared hosting and WordPress hosting is in the appearance of the websites. Let’s take a quick look at how they differ.

With shared hosting, your website will look just like any other website that is using the same design template. The only differences will be the domain name and the footer which indicates the site is hosted by the particular web host. However, with WordPress hosting, you get the ability to completely customize the appearance of your site. That means you can choose from a variety of free designs or you can purchase a premium design through WordPress’ own market place. In addition to that, you can choose from a variety of available color schemes, change the layout to suit your needs, and add or remove features as you see fit.

Ultimately, shared hosting and WordPress hosting provide similar functionality, but the former is generally considered less suitable for high-traffic websites or blogs. If you’re looking to start a business blog or website, you may want to consider going with a WordPress hosting plan to maximize your functionality and minimize your costs.