How to Set Up a WordPress Website on a Linux Hosting Account

If you’re looking for a free, easy-to-use, and highly-recommended blogging platform, consider setting up a WordPress website. Not only can you start a blog for free, but you can also use the various themes available to fully customize the appearance to fit your needs! In this article, we’ll discuss some of the basics of how to set up a WordPress website on Linux so you can get started quickly and easily.

WordPress General

First things first, you’ll want to download and install WordPress. The recommended version is currently 20.0, but any recent version should work fine. To do this, visit the WordPress website, click on the Download button to the right of the page, and then choose your preferred download option. Make sure to extract the downloaded file to your desktop so you can easily access it later.

After installation is complete, you’ll want to visit the WordPress dashboard to see the many features available to you. You can do this by entering the following URL in your web browser: http://localhost/wordpress

This is the basic URL for WordPress, and it will take you to the admin area of your dashboard. From here, you can begin creating and editing content as usual. You’ll notice that even though WordPress is generally installed on a Linux web server, some aspects of the platform still require you to use your web browser for operations, so don’t forget about that! If you’re looking for a more detailed step-by-step tutorial on how to set up a WordPress website, check out this comprehensive guide by DigitalOcean.

Choose A Hosting Provider

Next, you’ll want to choose a hosting provider. Like WordPress, hosting is also something you should look for in a web host provider, but you may also want to consider looking at other platforms as well. When choosing a host for your WordPress site, make sure that you’re looking for a reputable company that offers a good value proposition and has a good reputation in the industry. Avoid anything that sounds too good to be true because it probably is.

If you visit the WordPress website’s reviews section, you’ll see that many people are hesitant to recommend specific host providers due to the fact that many of them are pretty shady. In comparison, you’ll find many highly-rated companies that offer a great hosting experience and have a special focus on supporting WordPress users. For example, look at Hover’s review, which states the following:

“Overall, we love [Hover] and recommend it to anyone who’s looking for a simple, clean, and fast hosting experience. It’s important to note that this is not a dedicated WordPress hosting provider, but it does support many popular platforms including WP itself.”

Hover provides a shared hosting plan that’s discounted when you sign up for a year or more. This is a good choice for people who are just starting out or are looking for a reliable, hassle-free option, as it takes the stress out of worrying about scalability and security.

Install WordPress On The Hosted Server

Once you’ve found a reputable host and chosen the appropriate plan, you can move onto the next step which is to install WordPress on the hosted server. To do this, simply follow the instructions laid out in the WordPress documentation. To give you a better understanding of how things work, here’s a step-by-step tutorial on how to install WordPress on a Linux web server.

First, you’ll want to login to your account with your domain provider (if you use one) and log in to your WordPress dashboard. From here, you can click on the Install button in the WordPress footer to start the process. Follow the instructions to create a database and install WordPress on your server.

You can also choose to install a fresh copy of WordPress or choose to upgrade an existing one. When you click on the Install button, you’ll see the following message:

“This will overwrite your original WordPress files and install a fresh version of WordPress on your site. Are you sure you want to continue?

If you want to start fresh with a clean WordPress install, click on the Updating WordPress button. If you’re upgrading an existing WordPress installation, click on the Continue button. You’ll then be presented with a shortform to enter your MySQL data including the admin username, password, and database name.

Customize Your Site And Blog

Once you’ve got WordPress installed, you can begin customizing your site. From the WordPress dashboard, click on the Appearance option under the Appearance menu. In the resulting screen, you can choose a theme for the site. Some themes are designed primarily for blogs, while others are focused on websites, so be sure to choose the one that’s right for your needs. Once you’ve chosen a theme, you can click on the Install button to preview the changes and make sure everything looks the way you want it to.

If there are any errors or problems with the installation, you can contact the WordPress support team directly from your WordPress dashboard. Just click on the Support option under the Appearance menu and select the Get Help button to reach WordPress’s support team. Keep in mind that because WordPress is open-source, anyone can access the source code, and as a result, use it to help build their website. This means that if you’re finding a support problem, you may be able to solve it yourself by looking at how others have done it.

Testing And Debugging

Once your site is up and running, you’ll want to test it thoroughly before publishing it to see how it looks. While it’s always good to proceed with caution, you can use the various plugins available for WordPress to test your site’s various functions and performance. If you find that any plugin isn’t working properly, you can go back and try another one or try the built-in debugging tool within WordPress. Using these resources will help you find any errors or problems before taking the time to publish.

When everything is set up and tested well, you can go back to the WordPress dashboard and click on the Publish button or the Update button to make your blog publicly available. While this might not seem obvious, it’s essential to remember that just because your site is up and running, it doesn’t mean that it’s ready for use.

WordPress’s website states the following about testing and debugging:

“During the setup process, you’ll be given the option to test out your WordPress site’s various functions and performance. Once you’re satisfied with how it looks, you can click on the Publish button to make the blog available to the public. However, before doing so, you should test out the blog’s various functions and performance to make sure it’s up to par.”

Create A Maintenance Plan

If you find that maintaining a regularly-updated blog can be quite the task, you can create a plan to automatically update it with a new post once a week.

To do this, return to the WordPress dashboard and click on the Settings option under the Settings menu. In the resulting screen, you can enter your login details for a Google account. Once you’ve logged in, you can use the dashboard’s search function to quickly find “Automatically Update”, which is a feature that will cause WordPress to check for new posts on a regular basis and upload them to your site. Just click on the checkbox next to the option you’re interested in and then click on Save Settings.

You can also use this function to have WordPress check for and notify you of any new comments or posts on your blog. Just like that, you have a way to keep your blog automatically updated without needing to lift a finger!

WordPress offers many features that you can take advantage of, making it a versatile, popular, and highly-recommended blogging platform. If you’re looking for a free, easy-to-use, and highly-recommended blogging platform, consider setting up a WordPress website. Not only can you start a blog for free, but you can also use the various themes available to fully customize the appearance to fit your needs! In this article, we discussed some of the basics of how to set up a WordPress website on Linux so you can get started quickly and easily.